Republic Day Food Unity in diversity Indian Cuisi | Recipes | Chef Sanjeev Kapoor

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Republic Day Food Unity in diversity Indian Cuisi

Unity in diversity is probably a term that best describes India. This republic day, we bring to you recipes from across the nation that are same-same but different! Take a look.


These crisp puris filled with chatpata-spicy- sweet water and condiments vary slightly from one place to another.  What is common is their serious fan following everywhere.


Pani PuriIn a Mumbaiyaa style pani puri the filling inside is made with boiled mashed potatoes, moong- chana and sometimes ragda or boiled white peas. The water is a mix of sweet date chutney and the chatpata paani often with booni added to it.


Golgappa Golgappa is the common name of this chaat all through north India. The water in it has a more minty flavour and the filling remains the same like elsewhere in the country. They are also known as batashe or paani ke batashe in some parts.


Puchka Puchkas are less sweet and more on the spicy and tangy side with bland boiled potatoes or white peas.  The puri has a higher ratio of semolina as compared to refined flour and is relatively huger than your average golgappa or pani puri puri.

In a country like ours fresh seasonal vegetables are in abundance and vary fromplace to place. Mixed vegetables are prepared across the country and each preparation is unique.

Avial South Indian or to be more precise Kerala style mixed vegetables made in coconut oil with raw banana, gourds, carrots, drumsticks and a choice mix of vegetables in a yogurt coconut sauce, finished off with a tempering of curry leaves.


Chorchori This is the Bengali version of mixed vegetables where again you can use any mix of vegetables you want but make sure you don’t miss out on preparing this with mustard oil and panch phoron spice mix for the quintessential Bengali flavour that ever chorchori must have!


UndhiyuThis Gujarati specialty not only has plenty of winter veggies but also fried dough dumplings known as muthiya. Its feast time when you see undhiyu fragrant dish on the menu.

Most Indians can vouch for the fact their meals seem a little incomplete without a substantial rice dish and a khichdi is a top bet. Check out these three that are the same favourite one pot comfort food but with slight regional variations

Bisi Belle Huliyana Think of all the delightful veggies and fragrant spices that go into a sambhar cooked to perfection along with some long grain rice and finally finished off with a pure ghee tempering of curry leaves and mustard seeds. Bisi bele huliyana is like sambhar rice in one pot!


Bhog Khichidi This is a Kolkatta version prepared especially during durga puja and is less khichdi more pulao. Made with lentils and rice a number of veggies are added to build it up further. Spicy and fulfilling serve it along with some raita to cool things down.


Char dal Ni Khichdi This is a simple Gujarati preparation that is made with 4 types of lentils and rice. No veggies in this one. Serve it along with roasted papad, some pickle and a Gujarati kadhi and you have a plateful of simple delicious comfort food ready in a jiffy!

Chicken Curry is something which evokes happy memories for most. Its perfect food for sunday lunches, parties and gatherings. Take your pick on how you want to prepare your next favourite classic celebratory dish.

Punjabi Chicken Curry Prepared with a simple onion tomato masala this Punjabi chicken curry is every North Indian moms go to recipe. Known as highway or dhaba chicken curry because of it really popular along highway dhabas of the North and there is not much doubt why – its quick made with basic ingredients and delicious!


Kori Gassi – A coconut based spicy thick chicken curry from Mangalore, Karnataka. You can eat this with anything from rice to bread to idlis and dosas. The best bet though is with rotti – thin crisp papad like rice pancakes that soak up the delicious flavours of the masala beautifully.

Meat lovers delight this combination of cooking lentils and meat has resulted in two very pleasurable and delicious dishes from two very different communities in India.

DhansaakA dish most of us associate Parsi cuisine with, dhansaak is a delightful combination of mutton and dal traditionally served with brown rice. A nap is the best thing on the agenda after this rich and flavourful one pot meal.


Haleem This Hyderabadi celebratory food is made with mutton, broken wheat and dals – cooked t6ogether in perfection till the flavours come together in perfect harmony with each other. Serve garnished with fried onions, mint an lemon wedge and a mandatory drizzle of pure ghee.

Fish – Being a peninsular, India is blessed with abundant seafood and that has resulted in so many fish recipes that are so similar yet so different from each other.

Patrani Machchi We know people that especially attending Parsi weddings so they can gorge on this delicious fish preparation. Fillets of pomfret slathered in spicy coconuty chutney, wrapped in banana leaf and steamed till perfection. What is not to love!

Fish PaturiSweet river water fish marinated with pungent kasundi or mustard paste marinade and steamed. The Bengalis can probably eat this any time of the day. Serve along with a side of steamed rice and a wedge of lemon for instant satisfaction.

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MasterChef Sanjeev Kapoor

Chef Sanjeev Kapoor is the most celebrated face of Indian cuisine. He is Chef extraordinaire, runs a successful TV Channel FoodFood, hosted Khana Khazana cookery show on television for more than 17 years, author of 150+ best selling cookbooks, restaurateur and winner of several culinary awards. He is living his dream of making Indian cuisine the number one in the world and empowering women through power of cooking to become self sufficient. His recipe portal www.sanjeevkapoor.com is a complete cookery manual with a compendium of more than 10,000 tried & tested recipes, videos, articles, tips & trivia and a wealth of information on the art and craft of cooking in both English and Hindi.